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Category Archives: HomeOwnership

Save Energy At Home – Energy Efficiency Tips for Homeowners

8 Ways to Save Energy at Home

We could all agree that saving a little more cash on your utility bills would be nice. But maybe you’ve heard living energy efficient would take a whole lot of time, effort, and money you simply can’t afford? In such unprecedented times there has to be a way to tip the scales in your favor without breaking the bank. We thought the same thing and compiled a list of simple low-cost and no-cost energy solutions that are easy to do to save energy at home.

1. Reduce Energy Waste with Smart Power Strips

Devices that continue to draw power when they appear to be turned off can cost up to $200 a year in wasted energy. Fight this by regularly unplugging your devices, or let a smart power strip do the work for you. The features of advanced power strips make it easier than ever to ensure devices are fully powered down.

Learn more about smart strips equipped with motion sensors, voltage sensitivity controls and master switches, and easily learn which model is right for you.

2. Maintain Your Heating and Cooling System

The average household spends more than $2,000 a year on energy bills, with nearly half of that going to heating and cooling. A well maintained system can save a lot. Change your air filter regularly, and have a professional perform scheduled tune-ups.

3. Set Your Refrigerator for Optimum Cooling and Freshness

ENERGY STAR® recommends a temperature range between 35° and 38°F to keep food fresh while not wasting energy.

4. Use the Cold Water Cycle in Your Washing Machine

Washing your clothes in cold water saves big on water heating costs. It also keeps colors from fading and clothes from shrinking.

5. Seal Your Windows and Doors

Use caulk and weather stripping to seal air leaks around windows and doors. Homeowners save an average of $200 per year on heating and cooling by better insulating and sealing their homes.

6. Save the Game Console for Gaming

If you stream content to your TV, use a dedicated set-top box, smart TV or streaming-capable Blu-ray player. Game consoles use far more energy than these alternatives.

7. Heat your Water to 120°F

At an average of $250 a year, water heating is the second largest energy cost for most households. Don’t overheat your water only to mix it with cold. 120°F will give you hot showers while saving energy too.

8. Upgrade Your Homes Lighting

Light your home with ENERGY STAR certified LED bulb, the simple choice for energy efficiency. LED lighting is the simple option to save energy, money and protect the planet for future generations.

Additional resources can be found under “Energy Efficiency Tips for Homeowners” by the Consumers Energy

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Cold Weather Home Owner Tips

Stay Safe During & After a Winter Storm

Winter storms are dangerous. They can bring cold temperatures, power failures, loss of communication services, and icy roads. This can make being outside dangerous, so you should limit your time outside. Although staying indoors as much as possible can help reduce the risk of car crashes and falls on the ice, you may also face hazards inside your home.

Heat your home safely

If you plan to use a wood stove, fireplace, or space heater, be extremely careful. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions and remember these safety tips:

Turning on the stove for heat is not safe; have at least one of the following heat sources in case the power goes out:

  • Extra blankets, sleeping bags, and warm winter coats
  • Fireplace that is up to code with plenty of dry firewood or a gas log fireplace
  • Portable space heaters or kerosene heaters. Check with your local fire department to make sure that kerosene heaters are legal in your area.
  • Use electric space heaters with automatic shut-off switches and non-glowing elements. Make sure to keep them away from any flammable materials, like curtains or blankets.
  • Use fireplaces, wood stoves, or other combustion heaters only if they are properly vented to the outside and do not leak gas from the flue or exhaust into the indoor air space.
  • Have your heating system serviced by a qualified technician every year.
  • Do not burn paper in a fireplace.
  • Make sure you have proper ventilation if you must use a kerosene heater.
  • Use only the type of fuel your heater is designed to use—don’t substitute.
  • Keep heat sources, like space heaters, at least 3 feet away from drapes, furniture, or bedding. Never cover your space heater.
  • Never place a space heater on top of furniture or near water.
  • Never leave children unattended near a space heater.
  • Make sure that the cord of an electric space heater is not a tripping hazard, but do not run the cord under carpets or rugs.
  • Avoid using extension cords to plug in your space heater.
  • If your space heater has a damaged electrical cord or produces sparks, do not use it.

 

Light your home safely

If there is a power failure:

 

Use generators and other appliances safely.

  • Generators should be located at least 20 feet from any window, door, or vent and in a space where rain and snow will not reach them.
  • Protect yourself from carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning by installing a battery-operated CO detector.
  • Never using generators, gas or charcoal grills, camp stoves, or similar devices inside your home, in basements, in garages, or near windows. The fumes are deadly.
  • Plug in appliances to the generator using individual heavy-duty, outdoor-rated extension cords.
  • Do not use the generator or appliances if they are wet.
  • Do not store gasoline indoors where the fumes could ignite.

Conserve heat

  • Some gas-fueled heaters, such as vent-less gas fireplaces, require some ventilation. Otherwise, if you don’t need extra ventilation, keep as much heat as possible inside your home.
  • Avoid unnecessarily opening doors or windows.
  • Close off unneeded rooms.
  • Stuff towels or rags in cracks under doors.
  • Close draperies or cover windows with blankets at night.

 

Make sure babies and older adults stay warm

Babies

Infants less than one year old should never sleep in a cold room because they lose body heat more easily than adults. Follow these tips to keep your baby safe and warm during the extreme cold:

  • Remove any pillows or other soft bedding. These can increase the risk of smothering and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS).
  • Dress babies in warmer clothing such as footed pajamas, one-piece wearable blankets, or sleep sacks.
  • Try to maintain a warm temperature inside your home. If you’re not able to keep your home warm, make temporary arrangements to stay elsewhere.
  • In an emergency, you can keep your baby warm using your own body heat. If you must sleep, take precautions to prevent rolling on or smothering your baby.

Older Adults

Older adults often make less body heat because of a slower metabolism and less physical activity. Check on elderly friends and neighbors often to make sure their homes are heated properly.

If you are over 65 years of age, check the temperature in your home often during extremely cold weather.

 

Keep a water supply

Extreme cold can cause water pipes in your home to freeze and sometimes rupture or break. When you are expecting very cold or freezing temperatures:

  • Leave all water taps slightly open so they drip continuously.
  • Keep the temperature inside your home warm.
  • Allow heated air to reach pipes. For example, open cabinet doors beneath the kitchen and bathroom sinks.
  • If your pipes do freeze, do not thaw them with a torch. Thaw the pipes slowly with warm air from an electric hair dryer.
  • If you cannot thaw your pipes, or the pipes have broken open, use bottled water or get water from a neighbor’s home.
  • As an emergency measure, if no other water is available, snow can be melted for water. Bringing water to a rolling boil for one minute will kill most germs but won’t get rid of chemicals sometimes found in snow.
  • Visit Keep Food and Water Safe After a Disaster or Emergency to learn more.

 

Eat well-balanced meals, and avoid alcoholic or caffeinated drinks.

Eating well-balanced meals will help you stay warmer. Do not drink alcoholic or caffeinated beverages—they cause your body to lose heat faster. Instead, drink warm, sweet beverages or broth to help keep yourself warm. If you have any dietary restrictions, ask your doctor.

Additional resources can be found under “Staying Safe During a Winter Storm” by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Man and woman playing in the snow outside of a house

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